DuckFlesh@aol.com
Sat, 17 Feb 2001 21:26:27 EST


In a message dated 2/17/01 5:25:31 PM Central Standard Time, z@gundam.com
writes:

> >Elephant tusks are made of ivory, a hard creamy-white modified dentine.
> Ivy is
> a widely cultivated ornamental climbing or prostrate or sometimes shrubby
> chiefly Eurasian vine (Hedera helix) of the ginseng family with evergreen
> leaves, small yellowish flowers and black berries.
>
> The term "Ivy League" was coined circa 1939 to describe a group of
> long-established eastern U.S. colleges widely regarded as high in
> scholastic and
> social prestige -- generally Harvard, Princeton and Yale. The term derives
> from
> the common architecture or these schools, which consisted of castle-like
> brick
> buildings with ivy-covered halls modeled after the great British
> universities
> such as Cambridge, Eton and Oxford. The term "ivy" had already been
> applied to
> Academia in general circa 1933 and, by 1943, students at or graduates of
> these
> prestigious schools were called Ivy Leaguers. The Ivy League became
> associated
> with the rich and powerful, who formed their "Old Boy Networks" from among
> their
> college classmates.
>
> The Ivy League schools lost a lot of their prestige after World War II,
> when a
> college education became available to more and more people of lesser and
> lesser
> means, thanks in part to the G.I. Bill and the post-War emphasis on
> technology,
> which made MIT and Stanford the new schools of choice.
>
>

Did you know that off hand, or did you look it up?



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