Brett Jensen (heero@earthlink.net)
Tue, 12 Dec 2000 21:43:59 -0600


garrick lee wrote:

> alan's death early on in 0083 is a better example of
> death being indiscriminate. unfortunately the
> character is not developed at all, giving the viewer
> no reason for getting attached.

I see your point.

> heck, ben dixon's (forget his jap name, sorry :P)
> death in macross tv series is a far better example of
> horror of war and how death doesn't choose anybody.
> he basically had no way out (of course, you can argue
> that the nutty guy cheated death more times than he
> deserved prior to the barrier overload death...but
> that's another thing ;P).

Hayao Kakizaki. Yeah, I agree. His death in the movie is even more shocking because of it's suddenness. He lived alot longer than he had
any right too...poor bastard.

> fokker died a tragic death (tv death) in a way that
> was equally cool as it was equally stooopid (something
> no character has ever been able to come close to in a
> while), but not a poorly written plot-contrived death
> as south burning. :P

I guess I'm willing to overlook inconsistent animation, for a great story in Macross, And I'm willing to overlook inconsistant writing for
great animation in 0083. ^_^

> > It's a bit more complicated than that. It has to do
> > with a feeling of
> > being lied to.
>
> why? nobody took pains to conceal the fact that
> robotech was indeed a pastiche. the target audience
> never cared at the time.

Life story mode:

Well, you must understand that I grew up in a very small town in the black hole of culture known as northwestern Missouri. I had to watch
Robotech with a very snowy picture, broadcast from a UHF station 100 miles away. I lived for robotech, complete utter fanaticism. I never
learned about Robotech's origins until the late 80s, when I found a copy of "Robotech art 1" at waldenbooks in St Joe. Slowly but surely I
got the novels, and found out about, Protoculture addicts "the official Robotech fanzine". I subscribed. By the time I got my first issue,
It was their first issue as an anime magazine. (Comic book size, with Ranma on the cover) Inside they were talking about some Robot show
called Gundam... I was doomed. I got a flyer for AnimeCon 91 with some Robotech tapes, and knew I had to go, I scraped the money
together for the trip and I was floored. I went straight from Robotech to pure untranslated anime, and loved it.

> i grew up, discovered the mishmash job, got let down
> for a moment, and thought "by goomba, this is an
> amazing work of cut & paste genius!". i was actually
> able to appreciate robotech more (and be more
> forgiving of all it's flubs) from knowing about it's
> bastardous origins.

I went thru a period of about 2 years after getting into anime, where I still liked robotech and even liked dubs, but somehow my tastes
just changed.. I knew from the beginning that i liked the acting better in the Japanese versions, but I was kind of afraid of subs. I
finally bit the bullet and bought Riding Bean. (I already had a raw copy from AnimeCon) and after that I didn't bother with dubs at all.

As I got to see the original series that made up Robotech, I found that I liked them alot better than robotech. It was probably the
devotion that so many fans had for the mythologies of robotech, (Zor, the Regis, (Philbin?) the shapings...ugh) that really turned me off
the most though.

---Brett Jensen

-
Gundam Mailing List Archives are available at http://gundam.aeug.org/



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.0b3 on Thu Dec 14 2000 - 00:43:13 JST