Brett Jensen (heero@earthlink.net)
Thu, 14 Sep 2000 08:13:52 -0700


-Z- wrote:

> Except during genocidal conflicts in which no one, man, woman or child, was
> safe, children have, until recently, been regarded as something to be nurtured
> and protected.

No they were, and still are in many parts of the world treated as a source of free
labor. Why do you think that boys are so preferred in many cultures? Because they
were stronger and could do more work. as pointed out previously the idea of
childhood as a special, happy time is a fairly recent one.

> out the same way. Children were simply off limits, not fair game.

I do agree with the idea that young children shouldn't be targetted by advertising,
but as far as I'm concerned once you hit about 15 you should be able to watch and
listen too pretty much whatever you want. By then you've seen it all at school
anyway.

I'll have no problem with my kid playing resident evil or doom type games when he's
10 or 11. They'll probably be full imersion VR by then. He's 1 year old today.

> Crimes against children used to be abhorrent even to the most hardened criminal.
> The life expectancy of a child molester was measurable in weeks, because he'd be
> killed by the other inmates, usually with the tacit assistance of the guards.

As it should be. but I wouldn't equate selling a $50 game, (which unless kids are
getting a shitload more allowance these days, requires a parent to buy it...) to
molesting a child.

> Child labor was instituted during the Industrial Revolution by the same types of
> people who are targetting children commercially today.

Before that it was parents exploiting their kids on the farm.

> Children are animals who must be taught how to be human. It's the resposibility
> of adults to teach them by way of example and ideal. When children's fare
> becomes the same as adult fare, how will they learn to be human?

FROM THEIR PARENTS... DUH!

> All it takes for evil to triumph is that good people do nothing; conversely, for
> good to triumph, it's required that good people work together and stand up for
> what they believe is right.

Evil is a slippery concept if you look deeper than Judeo Christian platitudes.

> No, being treated like a commodity, and a throwaway one at that, is what warps
> our children. A hundred years ago, news traveled slowly and one was surrounded
> for the most part by an extended family. Now we live in pockets of isolation,
> where neighbors are strangers, and where we're constantly bombarded by messages
> we can't ignore.

I can't argue with that.

> Seeing someone smoke a cigarette isn't the problem. Being bombarded with images
> and messages that tell you that it's cool to smoke and that you can't possibly
> be cool unless you smoke

You just don't get it do you? It's peer pressure! The "bad" kids don't need any
advertising to take up bad habits. and the "Good" kids see that the bad kids are
cool and act like them. I was a fricken angel until I went to grade school, I didn't
cuss or disobey or anything. (Even though I watched tons of TV)
I got all my bad habits from other kids, and in High school when I wanted to piss
off my parents and stuff.

> I didn't advocate ignoring violence, only that we should stop glorifying it and
> presenting it as a solution to conflicts of interest.

So you don't like Swarzenegger films then?

> In other words, preserve your own innocence, whatever little you may have left.

No thanks... I'd rather live my life with my eyes wide open.

---Brett Jensen

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