Chien Ting Chin (chinc@sten.sunnybrook.utoronto.ca)
Sat, 28 Aug 1999 18:37:07 -0400 (EDT)


On Sat, 28 Aug 1999, -Z- wrote:
> But the "climactic changes" attributed to the colony drops may have less to
> do with the impact than with the atmospheric disruptions that occurred
> during the drop itself…!

Very interesting analysis. I was thinking about the atmospheric friction
myself when I was watching CCA. But I went on a different line than you.

Now tons (ok maybe a bit less) of rocks fall into Earth every year. But
they have very little effect because most of them are small enough to be
burnt off in the atmosphere. Now while a colony itself is huge, it's a
hollow tube. So effectively it's a 1 meter thick sheet falling thru air.
The frictional burning must be incredible. In fact, if it has 18-60
Gigaton of energy there's no way it won't burn up a 1 m thick object
before impact.

What do you think?

CHIN, Chien Ting
Dept of Medical Biophysics, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre
... o O *
Man is a bubble

-
Gundam Mailing List Archives are available at http://gundam.aeug.org/



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.0b3 on Sun Aug 29 1999 - 07:54:44 JST